Click one of the states below to browse Crop Scouting Reports in your region.

ARKANSAS
IDAHO
IOWA
KANSAS
MINNESOTA
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NORTH DAKOTA
SOUTH DAKOTA
WASHINGTON
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ARKANSAS

Augusta, Arkansas

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Joey York - Augusta, AK

Joey York
Agronomist
870-253-1987

Jared Wood - Augusta, AK

Jared Wood
Agronomist
870-919-0781

Perry Galloway - Augusta, AK

Perry Galloway
Agronomist
501-940-3575

Brant Burkett - Augusta, AK

Brant Burkett
Agronomist
870-919-6103

Crop scouting report unavailable.

IDAHO

Buhl, Idaho

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Van Wiebe - Buhl, ID

Van Wiebe
Agronomist
208-731-8613

TJay Young - Buhl, ID

TJ Young
Agronomist
208-313-8896

Tyson Goossen- Buhl, ID

Tyson Goossen
Agronomist
208-308-1931

Eddie Gonzalez - Buhl, ID

Eddie Gonzalez
Agronomist
208-490-0181

2 qts of Roundup will do a great job of burning down regrowth and weeds in stubble fields.

Tyson Goossen

If Zeal didn’t get good enough control on spider mites, you can chemigate a pint of Dimethoate.

Eddie Gonzalez

IOWA

Rockwell, Iowa

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Todd Robeoltman - Rockwell, IA

Todd Robeoltman
Agronomist
641-425-0260

Tim Nuehring - Rockwell, IA

Tim Nuehring
Agronomist
641-430-4905

Paul Helland - Rockwell, IA

Paul Helland
Agronomist
641-430-2685

Mike Jaeger - Rockwell, IA

Mike Jaeger
Agronomist
641-330-9603

Brian Pottebaum - Rockwell, IA

Brian Pottebaum
Agronomist
515-290-4098

Adam Drewelow- Rockwell, IA

Adam Drewelow
Agronomist
319-415-8494

Shelby Cornelius- Rockwell, IA

Shelby Cornelius
Agronomist
319-483-8776

Why do I have Physoderma in my corn when I post applied fungicide? Although fungicide may have been utilized it is NOT specifically labeled for this disease. Physoderma brown spot and stalk rot is common. Some products are just NOT labeled.

Hybrids have differing susceptibility to this crippling disease, and crop debris and soils can host it for 2 – 7 years. Corn is most susceptible to infection between stages V5 to V9. It becomes visually prominent and can affect standability at reproductive stages after VT.

Paul Helland

Which variety will perform best in 2020? I recommend spreading risks with a minimum of five varieties. In August field walks be investigating insect pressure, leaf color, cob quality, kernel depth, kernel count, stand counts, and stalk quality. Planning for 2021 planting began when the planter dropped its first kernel in 2020.

The common denominator for corn issues in 2020 has been residue. Fight back this fall with the following:

Todd Robeoltman

Does faster emergence with Hefty Complete really matter? Yes, emergence pays. During a recent pre-harvest field walk, in a parcel with three different varieties from the same planter on the same day, there was a visible difference in emergence.

Hefty Complete: Chalk line ear placement 100% brown silk.

Competitor: Some silks not yet brown and erratic ear placement.

Mike Jaeger

Sheldon, Iowa

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Connor Majerus - Sheldon, IA

Connor Majerus
Agronomist
712-363-6501

Adam Sauer - Sheldon, IA

Adam Sauer
Agronomist
712-348-3851

Haley - Sheldon, IA

Haley Wagenaar
Agronomist
712-324-1189

There’s little left you can do to change soybean and corn yield, but it’s important to keep scouting. The time you take to scout can help come harvest, to avoid any surprises. Taking notes on hybrids and varieties will help in next year’s seed selection. I suggest to even be checking for weed concerns in soybean fields when the leaves start to fall off, and to take note of what is out there.

Haley Wagenaar

We are seeing pollination issues in corn fields around the area. Early season stress and dry soil caused uneven emergence. This issue followed by dry, hot conditions during pollination has caused tipback and missing kernels. The crop looks really good, but we may have lost some of the top end.

Adam Sauer

KANSAS

Garden City, Kansas

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Aaron Elam - Garden City, KS

Aaron Elam
Agronomist
620-277-6313

Travis Parsons - Garden City, KS

Travis Parsons
Agronomist
620-290-0224

Jordan Loewen- Garden City, KS

Jordan Loewen
Agronomist
620-668-0001

Garden City, KS - Guy Pugh

Guy Pugh
Agronomist
405-834-8581

Keep scouting, there have been a few areas with bugs.

Aaron Elam

Guessing and getting the wrong fertility is one of the worst mistakes that can hurt your farm on yields. An easy way to fix that is by getting soil and tissue samples pulled and sent into a lab. The soil test will tell you what’s out there. Tissue samples will tell you what the plant is taking up and what is available. Your fertilizer applications can be dialed in to get your crop exactly what it needs, which raises your yield potential.

Jordan Loewen

With the recent weather, many fields have had the canopy ripped back open, allowing weeds to get sunlight again. Application of glyphosate can be beneficial, but make sure to read the label. Applications can mostly be applied at/around black layer according to many labels.

Travis Parsons

As our soybean crops are getting closer to harvest, now would be a great idea to apply a fungicide for your maximum yield potential! Remember 30-45 days prior to harvest! Pictured below are Hefty 37X8 soybeans.

Guy Pugh

MINNESOTA

Fairmont, Minnesota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Steve Draper - Fairmont, MN

Steve Draper
Agronomist
507-236-3498

Mike Bates - Fairmont, MN

Mike Bates
Agronomist
507-236-1330

Evan Oberdieck - Fairmont, MN

Evan Oberdieck
Agronomist
612-801-8154

Hans Hinrichsen - Fairmont, MN

Hans Hinrichsen
Agronomist
507-236-3191

Sam Geistfeld - Fairmont, MN

Sam Geistfeld
Agronomist
507-848-0749

Nathan Rolling - Fairmont, MN

Nathan Rolling
Agronomist
507-236-7884

Don’t give up on spraying beans until they start to turn. We’ve had a lot of calls from farmers asking when they can stop scouting soybeans, but the answer is dependent on the situation. In general, I suggest continuing scouting until the soybean leaves start to change color.
There are two things to keep looking for, spider mites and soybean aphids. Spider mites can be very damaging till R7 stage, and soybean aphids are around R6 or full seed pods before they don’t need attention. Keep scouting for the next 20 days or so, till around September 1st. The soybeans are looking great and you don’t want to cost yourself bushels when insecticide is only about $4 per acre.

Mike Bates

Being out in the countryside, some fields have waterhemp/ragweed starting to poke through in soybeans. In most fields there aren’t many, but it’s something to keep an eye out for. If these weeds are left alone and make it through the combine this fall the weed seeds will get spread across the field. Something to keep in mind next spring is to put a good pre-emergence in corn down for those types of weeds.

Sam Geistfeld

Hancock, Minnesota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Adam Gibson - Hancock, MN

Adam Gibson
Agronomist
320-444-7280

Aaron Giese - Hancock, MN

Aaron Giese
Agronomist
320-766-2274

Aaron Erdahl - Hancock, MN

Aaron Erdahl
Agronomist
320-808-8555

Soybean aphids continue to increase in population in all areas. Newer to aphid threshold levels are soybeans into Stevens County. In addition to this pest, we have also been seeing spider mites in some fields. Spider mites favor soybeans or edible beans where they are drought stressed, so the first place to look is in beans that are showing drought stress. Mites are found on sandy or gravel veins in fields and in irrigation corners. They are small white and black pests that are found on the lower side of the lowest living leaves on the plant. We recommend pulling plants and shaking them over a white or black surface and look for them crawling around. We are still recommending Lorsban for all treatments because it kills both aphids and spider mites, other sprays are not nearly as effective.

Adam Gibson

Weather conditions in our area are not favorable for disease to develop currently, we have not seen much for white mold developing in soybeans. Warm and dry conditions are, however, favorable for aphid populations to multiply quickly. If you’re looking to spray aphids, Lorsban, or a generic, can be applied for $4-5 per acre. Please do not spray neonecotinoid insecticides post. This family of insecticides has the potential to be harmful to bee populations when applied post-emerge. We need to keep the neonic family available for seed treatments, where bees will not be harmed.

Aaron Giese

Hawley, Minnesota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Todd Brinkman - Hawley, MN

Todd Brinkman
Agronomist
701-412-7553

If you have seen Goss’s Wilt in your corn fields this year, consider rotating away from corn in those fields, or planting a hybrid with good resistance to the disease. Tilling to reduce leftover corn residue can help minimize places for the bacteria to overwinter as well.

Todd Brinkman

Le Roy, Minnesota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Grant Lunning - Le Roy, Minnesota

Grant Lunning
Agronomist
507-384-2256

Doug Dohlman - Le Roy, Minnesota

Doug Dohlman
Agronomist
507-993-1465

Dave Lunning - Le Roy, Minnesota

Dave Lunning
Agronomist
507-438-2649

Bob Grass - Le Roy, Minnesota

Bob Grass
Agronomist
507-438-9007

Continue to be on the lookout for aphids in your soybeans. I have had some calls of populations going up. With the cool weather, the populations can double every couple of days.

Grant Lunning

Marshall, Minnesota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Mike Homandberg - Marshall, MN

Mike Homandberg
Agronomist
605-310-9013

John Wiese - Marshall, MN

John Wiese
Agronomist
507-530-5250

Jeremy Jensen - Marshall, MN

Jeremy Jensen
Agronomist
507-530-5841

Dave Timmerman - Marshall, MN

Dave Timmerman
Agronomist
507-829-5882

Jeff Gladis - Marshall, MN

Jeff Gladis
Agronomist
507-487-5788

Brent Larson - Marshall, MN

Brent Larson
Agronomist
320-269-1577

Now would be a great time to take a late season leaf tissue sample from your corn to get an idea of what you did right or wrong for the year. Take the leaf opposite and below the dominant ear of the plant.

Mike Homandberg

I would still recommend checking fields for spider mites. Over the weekend, strong storms came through. Some of the spider mites were knocked off, but I was still finding quite a few healthy mites after the storms. Additionally, some farmers have had trouble killing spider mites with Lorsban. It seems the fields where the Lorsban is not working have had a history of the product being used for other insects in the last 5-6 years. If you have a history of using Lorsban in specific fields, consider a Bifenthrin product.

Brent Larson

Olivia, Minnesota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

John Scheibel - Olivia, MN

John Scheibel
Agronomist
320-579-0465

Brandon Howard, Olivia, MN

Brandon Howard
Agronomist
320-905-4203

Spider mites flared up the last week. Be scouting for them and other insects.

John Scheibel

Roseau, Minnesota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Scott Younggren - Roseau, MN

Scott Younggren
Agronomist
218-843-1718

Tyler Cosley - Roseau, MN

Tyler Cosley
Agronomist
218-526-0672

Within the next month would be a good time for a late summer burndown of weeds, especially in a no-till situation. This can help drastically for a clean start to next season. Post-harvest, 2 pts of 2,4-D tank mixed with 1 qt of Roundup would be a good choice for broad spectrum control.

Scott Younggren

Thief River Falls, Minnesota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Nikki Toft - Thief River Falls, MN

Nikki Toft
Agronomist
218-686-4086

Nikki Toft - Thief River Falls, MN

Aaron Yaggie
Agronomist

Crop scouting report unavailable.

Winthrop, Minnesota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Dean Christiansen - Winthrop, MN

Dean Christiansen
Agronomist
605-359-2408

Tony Hagen - Winthrop, MN

Tony Hagen
Agronomist
612-201-0141

Matt Vogel - Winthrop, MN

Matt Vogel
Agronomist
507-276-6089

Crop scouting report unavailable.

MONTANA

Great Falls, Montana

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Cory Ballard - Great Falls, MT

Cory Ballard
Agronomist
406-799-0170

Crop scouting report unavailable.

Sidney, Montana

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Barry Holzworth - Sidney, MT

Barry Holzworth
Agronomist
406-480-2024

Crop scouting report unavailable.

NEBRASKA

Laurel, Nebraska

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Rusty Reifenrath - Laurel, NE

Rusty Reifenrath
Agronomist
402-375-8776

Brendan Nicholson - Laurel, NE

Brendan Nicholson
Agronomist
402-369-3623

Kody Urwiler - Laurel, NE

Kody Urwiler
Agronomist
402-841-2096

Haley Greve - Laurel, NE

Haley Greve
Agronomist
402-841-2475

There have been reports of rust and northern corn leaf blight. Make sure to continue checking your corn fields for late diseases.

Kody Urwiler

Seward, Nebraska

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Dylan Codr - Seward, NE

Dylan Codr
Agronomist
402-450-5688

Devin Prochaska- Seward, NE

Devin Prochaska
Agronomist
402-367-9871

Chris Pranger - Seward, NE

Chris Pranger
Agronomist
402-525-0359

Crop scouting report unavailable.

West Point, Nebraska

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Jacob Gubbels - West Point, NE

Jacob Gubbels
Agronomist
402-380-7729

Michael Wiese - West Point, NE

Michael Wiese
Agronomist
402-720-2302

Danny Widhlem - West Point, NE

Danny Widhelm
Agronomist
402-372-7625

Jared Steffensmeier - West Point, NE

Jared Steffensmeier
Agronomist
402-920-2265

If you want to see what the limiting factor is in your fertility program, pull some end of season tissue tests and pair them with soil tests from the same area of the field. These tests can show you what nutrients are lowest in your crops and in the soil. By knowing this, you can plan an application of the missing nutrients to hopefully overcome the deficiency in 2021.

Michael Wiese

Wood River, Nebraska

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Kegan Macfee - Wood River, NE

Kegan Macfee
Agronomist
308-627-0431

Josh Dexter - Wood River, NE

Josh Dexter
Agronomist
308-390-0755

Cass Corman - Wood River, NE

Cass Corman
Agronomist
402-853-1572

We are still seeing high pressure of female adult root worm beetles in corn on corn fields that have been treated. If you are able to treat one more time before the females go into the ground, it would be worth it for years to come.

Josh Dexter

NORTH DAKOTA

Lisbon, North Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Brian Weight - Lisbon, ND

Brian Weight
Agronomist
701-680-0969

Spencer Schultz - Lisbon, ND

Spencer Schultz
Agronomist
701-680-2087

Becca Anderson - Lisbon, ND

Becca Anderson
Agronomist
701-429-7150

Many cover crop acres are being planted now. Rye is a nice cover crop that provides good weed control next year and has a great root system that makes a mellow seedbed. Turnips and radishes are a good option for breaking up soil compaction.

Spencer Schultz

Mohall, North Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Mark Henry - Mohall, ND

Mark Henry
Agronomist
701-833-4989

Charlie Adams- Mohall, ND

Charlie Adams
Agronomist
701-833-4959

Charlie Adams- Mohall, ND

Wyatt Stanley
Agronomist
701-833-4979

Wyatt Thompson - Mohall, ND

Wyatt Thompson
Agronomist
701-833-4969

Soybeans are at the R2 – R4 stage, so promote plant health with a fungicide to help boost the yields. We prefer the fungicides in the SDHI family like Priaxor at 4 oz.

Charlie Adams

SOUTH DAKOTA

Aberdeen, South Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Kalen Kjellsen - Aberdeen, SD

Kalen Kjellsen
Agronomist
605-216-6656

Jay Barnett - Aberdeen, SD

Jay Barnett
Agronomist
605-216-0375

Jay Barnett - Aberdeen, SD

Ryan Brick
Agronomist
605-290-9445

With all the PP in our area now would be a good time to consider applying fertilizer, like P and K, for next year’s crops to get the application out of the way early.

Jay Barnett

Baltic, South Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Rob Fritz - Baltic, SD

Rob Fritz
Agronomist
605-254-6957

Lee Fischer - Baltic, Sd

Lee Fischer
Agronomist
605-359-4784

Tyler Koenig - Baltic, SD

Tyler Koenig
Agronomist
605-690-4302

Joe Schieffer - Baltic, SD

Joe Schieffer
Agronomist
605-305-2410

Mike Bemboom - Baltic, SD

Mike Bemboom
Equipment Manager
605-351-3586

Jerry Weiland - Baltic, SD

Jerry Weiland
Tile Specialist
605-957-5050

I have started to see spider mites flare up in some fields in the area. A Warrior product will not take care of this problem, you need to run Lorsban to eliminate spider mites. If you prefer a product with some residual, you can also run Capture at a full rate to kill spider mites.

Tyler Koenig

Centerville, South Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Travis Petty - Centerville, SD

Travis Petty
Agronomist
605-359-2029

Ty Iverson - Centerville, SD

Ty Iverson
Agronomist
605-670-9736

Koty Short - Centerville, SD

Koty Short
Agronomist
605-670-1326

If you had any disasters that ruined your fields this year, such as hail, keep in mind that if you are putting a cover crop in those areas that there could be certain herbicide rotation restrictions. This is dependent on what you sprayed on your crop.

Ty Iverson

I got to look at a field that was just showing signs of gall midge. Best practices for a farmer to prevent them from growing into a bigger problem are to rotate to corn the next year and burn your road ditches or grass waterways every fall.

Koty Short

Freeman, South Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Lane Konrad - Freeman, SD

Lane Konrad
Agronomist
605-505-0543

Continue to scout your fields for bugs. Aphid pressure tends to increase around this time of the year. Spraying an insecticide will benefit you by reducing stress from insect feeding on the crop.

Lane Konrad

Gettysburg, South Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Eric Butz - Gettysburg, SD

Eric Butz
Agronomist
605-310-9277

Kyle Hawkinson - Gettysburg, SD

Kyle Hawkinson
Agronomist
605-769-0869

Make sure when you are burning down wheat stubble that you are watching the plant back time frame to winter wheat planting.

Kyle Hawkinson

We have confirmed Palmer amaranth in Potter county. Make sure you are checking your fields of any suspicious weeds and getting them taken care of before they go to seed. Palmer can grow 3″ per day and produce 2 million seeds per plant, so it’s important to be scouting regularly.

Eric Butz

Groton, South Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Chad Jessen - Groton, SD

Chad Jessen
Agronomist
605-216-3174

Chris Kassube - Groton, SD

Chris Kassube
Agronomist
605-395-7111

James Thompson - Groton, SD

James Thompson
Agronomist
605-380-0156

I have been seeing a lot of waterhemp breaking in soybean fields. If you have this problem, it would be a good idea for next year to use a residual product like Warrant, Dual, or Outlook on your first in-crop pass on soybeans.

James Thompson

Huron, South Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Alan Williams - Huron, SD

Alan Williams
Agronomist
605-350-1099

Jason Leyendecker - Huron, SD

Jason Leyendecker
Agronomist
605-354-5214

Jarid Bechen - Huron, SD

Jarid Bechen
Agronomist
605-999-5706

Kyle Wiese - Huron, SD

Kyle Wiese
Agronomist
605-237-5972

If you’re planning on putting any sort of cover crop in after wheat harvest, be sure to use a burndown product with no residual. Liberty, Paraquat, and Roundup are a few of the options you have.

Kyle Wiese

Kimball, South Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Mike Erickson - Kimball, SD

Mike Erickson
Agronomist
605-359-6738

Jeremy Nedved - Kimball, SD

Jeremy Nedved
Agronomist
605-999-8296

Tyson Serr - Kimball, SD

Tyson Serr
Agronomist
605-830-0115

If you’ve never tried it before, this is the year to try planting a cover crop on your wheat stubble. Crops like turnips and radishes can help immensely with compaction.

Mike Erickson

I know it’s early, but now is the time to think about what to do in front of your winter grass crop. Sharpen at 2 oz per acre is a great choice to burn down what broadleaves are there and give you residual for at least 3 weeks with good environmental conditions.

Jeremy Nedved

Watertown, South Dakota

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Jack Beutler - Watertown, SD

Jack Beutler
Agronomist
605-880-0787

Beau Wensing - Watertown, SD

Beau Wensing
Agronomist
605-881-4615

Jacob Ronke - Watertown, SD

Jacob Ronke
Agronomist
605-881-2382

Keep scouting, there have been a few areas with bugs.

Beau Wensing

If you have white mold on your farm this year, consider using a seed treatment such has Heads Up on your soybeans next spring. This, combined with a fungicide application, can help suppress white mold extremely well.

Jacob Ronke

WASHINGTON

Farmington, Washington

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Jamie Rovey - Farmington, WA

Jamie Rovey
Agronomist
509-595-0222

Josh Bafus - Farmington, WA

Josh Bafus
Agronomist
509-336-5634

Wheat harvest is just starting up for us on this side of the state. I’ve been noticing in some of the wheat fields that there are a lot of weeds like dogfennel and China lettuce under the canopy. Once the wheat is cut these will take off like wildfire, so we need to be diligent in getting them sprayed right away before they get too out of control. 48 oz of RT3 and 0.5-1.0 oz of Aim with AMS and MSO (1-2 qts/100) does a great job of burndown without any plant back restrictions.

Jamie Rovey

Quincy, Washington

MEET YOUR TEAM:

Sam Krautscheid - Quincy, WA

Sam Krautscheid
Agronomist
509-797-5161

Danny Hopkins - Quincy, WA

Danny Hopkins
Agronomist
509-750-6987

Dave Dye - Quincy, WA

Dave Dye
Agronomist
509-398-5400

David Hinkins - Quincy, WA

David Hinkins
Agronomist
509-398-4178

Devin Moon - Quincy, WA

Devin Moon
Agronomist
509-366-7489

Crop scouting report unavailable.